Accountability Survey Results

In August 2020, The BMLS Team created a survey asking for feedback on Main Line school’s responses and actions since the creation of this platform. We’d like to thank those who took the time to share their perspectives. We will be temporarily pausing our typical posts sharing Black experiences to share a handful of school’s results on our Instagram.
All school’s survey results and full reports will be published here on our website.


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Schools Represented


Schools Represented:

Shipley
Baldwin
Friends’ Central
Agnes Irwin
Lower Merion High School
Conestoga High School
Episcopal Academy
Springside Chestnut Hill Academy
Villa Maria Academy High School
Haverford
Academy of Notre Dame
Radnor High School
Merion Mercy Academy
Sacred Heart Academy
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Germantown Academy
Germantown Friends
Harriton High School
Delaware County Christian School
Devon Prep
Welsh Vally Middle School
Church Farm School
Penn Wynne elementary
Penn Charter
Waldron Mercy Academy
Bala Cynwyd Middle School
Gladwyne Elementary
Archbishop John Carroll

The following responses could not be accepted due to the institution not being on the Main Line or in the Inter-Ac:
Abington School District
Upper Darby High
Westtown School
Caravel Academy
“Clients in multiple districts in the Southeast PA”
Church Farm School


Full School Reports

The Agnes Irwin School

  • Number of respondents: 15
  • Affiliation of respondents: Former Students, Alums, Current Students, Parents, Former Faculty
  • 33% of respondent were satisfied with Agnes Irwin’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • 33% of respondents were satisfied with the action Agnes Irwin has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Agnes Irwin ranked a 1.93 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Agnes Irwin from its community: 
    • “They can try harder they never tried”
    • “Address issues as they come up instead of brushing them under the rug and trying to please all parents and alums, especially those who donate to the school, rather than doing what’s right. “
    • “diverse board members, better representation of black history in history class, diverse teachers”
    • “Educate the educators. So much racism comes from the teachers and faculty. Not only that, but when students are racist and intolerant towards one another, it is crucial that faculty step in, which they rarely do or did.”
    • “Listen to students more and stop catering to white donors”
    • “I think the school has started a long process that will require constant focus and resources to achieve success.  I am proud of their initial response and hope to see them continue this momentum.”
    • “Expand the curriculum- add anti racist reading immediately in response to today’s unrest and conversations. Hold workshops to bring micro aggression and racist behaviors to the table for discussion. Do more work.”
    • “A good first step would be to admit there is a problem, but I just can’t imagine AIS doing that. I don’t even know how the school can take further, actually beneficial steps without addressing how they’ve made mistakes in the past. That being said, they should listen to the experiences of minority students, actually reprimand students AND teachers who engage in racist behavior (including micro-aggressions), update the curriculum, and generally stop treating minority students like they’re second-class.”
    • “Actually DO something! They have been listening for years and doing nothing. Girls continue to be traumatized over and over again and the teachers and admin. does little or nothing to make it a safe place for them.”
    • “They so far have held optional forums which were in the summer. I think there should be required ones and every time something is required at our school and people don’t attend there is no disciplinary action taken. I think there should be a mandatory forum and if you don’t attend there should be detentions given out.”
    • “Most important thing is to hire Black teachers and administrators. Including Black men. Start early, and do not shy away from talking about race. Utilize all available resources to create a comprehensive anti-racist curriculum in all areas, especially English and history, as well as exploring the contributions of people of color in STEM – and do that early on so that kids are aware from the beginning that the world isn’t default white. Prioritize college counseling for Black students and get a new or additional college counselor.”
  • Key suggestions for the Agnes Irwin community to bring change:
    • “to educate every single person in this community on these issues and show them the impact their behavior has on children and how badly it can mess up our mental health.”
    • “Keep speaking up”
    • “Actively try to make a better society.”
    • “Continuing to keep the pressure on, sending letters and emails.”
    • “Required Forums”

Lower Merion High School

  • Number of respondents: 14
  • Affiliation of respondents: Current Students, Alums, and Parents
  • 7% of respondents were satisfied with Lower Merion High School’s response to these stories and our platform:
  • 7% of respondents were satisfied with the action Lower Merion High School has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Lower Merion High ranked a 1.57 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Lower Merion High School from its community:
    • Hire more poc, higher expectations for everyone,
    • A lot more staff training is necessary. Most teachers are unaware of their own bias or the bias in the curriculum. Most are not equipped to handle conversations about race and racism.
    • they can make the cop that sits in the cafeteria leave bc the cop only targets poc. they should also punish the kids who said racial slurs online.
    • Rewrite the curriculum to be inclusive of African American history which includes free Black people since the inception of America. Offer black students fair college counseling. Offer black students AP courses honors courses regardless their eighth grade teacher’s recommendations.
    • Include more education of black history in class, address the blatant racism that takes place everyday, stop unfairly punishing black students in comparison to white students, put out an actual plan of action on how they’re going to change for the better
    • The cultural proficiency/anti-racism training that teachers receive is absolutely not enough. There needs to be investment in Black students at an elementary level. Our school can afford six kayaks but won’t find room for free instruments for free/reduced lunch kids. There is no cultural push for Black excellence and efforts for diversity in honors/ap classes seem to have stopped once the school met a quota.
    • Add to the the history curriculum to improve the understanding of systemic racism against POC, especially black people. In addition to this, lessons on slavery, jim crow, etc, should be connected to current events to emphasize that racism is still very prevalent.
    • Also, there should be more of an effort to hire a more diverse staff. The student body at LMSD is generally representative of the general US population (obviously not perfectly), however, the teachers are overwhelmingly white (and christian).
    • Listen to their students who have cried out with their experiences. Provide therapy to said students (supposedly LMSD does this but it was never well known at all). Revamp history(start with the slave trade and involve how history has led us to where we are now) and in english to expose writers that isn’t just the same 5 white guys. Hold forums to educate students on things like microaggressions. There is so much more but even that would be a step.
    • Our school needs to stop allowing implicit bias to influence campus aids and teachers’ treatment of students. Black students are policed or treated more harshly than white students by a mile, and it’s not subtle at all. There needs to be more support systems in place (more teachers of color) for students of color, and anti-racist teaching/training for not only staff, but also all students (mostly white students).
    • Get rid of campus aides. No cops on campus.
  • Key suggestions for the Lower Merion High community to bring change
    • We just have to keep pressuring them. The district can easily be swayed by parents especially, so adults in particular just need to keep pushing. The kids are trying our best, but main line parents have to go hard too.
    • Only thing I can think of at the moment is just hold more rally’s, continue to spread awareness online, continue to have the tough conversations with fellow students and faculty
    • Force the schools to adopt 2020 Black Alumni Petition.pdf
    • Mobilize white patents because they have so much power that they haven’t been using to fight against racism.

Merion Mercy Academy

  • Number of respondents: 6
  • Affiliation of respondents: Current Students and Alums
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with Merion Mercy’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with the action Merion Mercy has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Merion Mercy ranked a 2 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Merion Mercy from its community: 
    • “Address systematic racism within their school and stop playing down racism.”
    • “Listen to what the people are saying, and hire more black faculty members”
    • “Promising to hire more diverse faculty, among all the teachers there are 2 poc and I believe one of them is leaving. As well as actually following through on what they say because there has been nothing to back it up”
    • “give students more education on racially sensitive topics”
    • “Hire diverse staff and train staff be diversified when teaching and allowing other students to make ignorant comments.”
    • “They can practice what they preach with “live mercy, seek justice” and treat all their students EQUALLY.”
  • Key suggestions for the Merion Mercy community to bring change:
    • “Assemble black alum groups to support students”
    • “Protest”

Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy

  • Number of respondents: 6
  • Affiliation of respondents: Current Students
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with Barrack Hebrew Academy’s response to these stories and our platform*
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with the action Barrack Hebrew Academy has taken in response to the stories on BMLS*
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Barrack Hebrew Academy ranked a 1.5 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Barrack Hebrew Academy from its community: 
    • “Hire black teachers, diversify curriculum, implement diversity training for school leadership”
    • “Listen to the voices of minorities within the school community and respect them.”
    • “If our school’s administration consistently strives to recruit diverse staff and students, we would generate a climate in which inclusion is an undeniably crucial component to Barrack’s values and aspirations.”
    • “Discipline students and faculty who make racist and insensitive remarks.” 
  • Key suggestions for the Barrack Hebrew Academy community to bring change:
    • “If community members contacted Barrack’s administrators to convey their demand to create a more equitable environment, the strength in numbers would hopefully assure that those who maintain the most power within my school’s community take the action to create an environment they are more than capable of composing.”
    • “Please recognize the racism that exists at barrack on blms because I think our teachers could use us not being on the account as saying we don’t have a problem. I know students have submitted stories. We have a small POC population at our school and that needs to change but that doesn’t negate the hurt that those students feel and the racism that exists within our school.”
  • *BMLS has not yet receive and/or posted submissions from a Black student at this school

Springside Chestnut Hill Academy

  • Number of respondents: 10
  • Affiliation of respondents: Parents, Alums, Current Students, Educators
  • 30% of respondents were satisfied with Springside Chestnut Hill’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: 
  • 20% of respondents were satisfied with the action Springside Chestnut Hill has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Springside Chestnut Hill ranked a 2 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Springside Chestnut Hill from its community: 
    • “There needs to be a comprehensive curriculum review and update and a transparent audit of how the school responds to student conduct issues to make sure that we are both teaching anti-racism and removing racial biases in our school. There’s more that needs to be done but those two steps would go a long way.”
    • “Hire more teachers of color, as well as administrators, hire a counselor of color, and a college counselor of color or who has experience working with students from all backgrounds. Take a hard look at the curriculum, especially for history and english. Make sure AP and advanced classes have students of color and that the requirements to get into those classes are the same for everyone. Diversity Trainings for teachers and staff , anti-racism training etc. Openly celebrate and educate the community on non-catholic holidays. No tolerance policy for racism and bullying/micro aggressions, from students and teachers, if a teacher allows racist behavior, they should also be punished. A safe space for students of color to go and speak with someone they can trust when they feel they are being wronged, by a teacher and or student, if they feel they have been punished for something a white student got a way with, or they feel they didnt get certain opportunities or grades when a white student with lesser accomplishments did.”
    • “they need to treat problems with black students the same as the would with any other students. they should take black students problems more seriously”
    • “Hire more black and brown staff for higher levels. Admitting mistakes and actually doing better. Creating a safe environment for black and brown students. Allowing a place for them to speak up and BELIEVING their story. Giving them the same respect, rights and benefits as their white students.”
    • “Work harder to get through to students who don’t know enough”
    • “Invite black members to help become inclusive, not white alumni who admit they are not they right person to ask.”
    • “Other departments besides History/English and some Foreign Language need to step up and carry some of the load. DEI isn’t a department project, it’s a whole school project.”
  • Key suggestions for the Springside Chestnut Hill community to bring change: same as above
    • “Keep up the pressure. I’ve been working at my school almost 20 years. We’ve had moments of momentum before but they’ve never been sustained and we’ve gone backwards in some places and ways. Sustained long-term pressure is needed.”

The Shipley School

  • Number of Respondents: 19 
  • Affiliations of Respondents: Alumni, Current Students, Educators
  • 11% of respondents were satisfied with Shipley’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: Yes 
  • 11% of respondents were satisfied with the action Shipley has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Shipley  ranked a 1.84 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Shipley from its community: 
    • “Hire more teachers of color, hold students and faculty accountable for their racist actions and aggressions, make race and ethnicity a mandatory course and incorporate the history of race in America into the already mandatory us history courses (and ENSURE these are actually taught by Black educators), offer senior elective African American literature to all english levels (and include these authors in all years), stop that 4th grade slave escape reenactment” 
    • “Create/release a detailed plan of how they will actually change the curriculum for starters and work to change the culture within the school through altering the SEED program to actually discuss diversity/race and have more politically/socially driven programs, assemblies, and conversations throughout the entire school. also teach teachers how to conduct classroom discussions that center on race more consciously and productively”
    • “Change the SEED curriculum (which is currently absolute bs) to include a full year in ninth grade on anti racism. hire more teachers of color and counselors of color. properly punish racist behavior, including past incidents that were swept under the rug (cue ghatmores).” 
    • “Truth telling and reconciliation”
    • “Speak to the black alumni. Hire more teachers and facility of color.”
    • “Admit to its past sins so that any commitment to do better can be taken seriously.”
    • “Adjust the code of conduct. Create a clear disciplinary process. Hold teachers and students accountable.”
    • “Listen to the community and take action when it comes to curriculum and disciplinary actions for those who do not support becoming a more inclusive environment whether that is teachers or students.” 
  • Key suggestions for the community to bring change: same as above
    • “Keep talking about it and speaking out about the inequality in our schools.”
    • “Protest! sit-in outside of principles offices/lmsd headquarters, team up w philly student union, demand change and don’t “play along” w the dehumanization of BIPOC in schools until we get our demands.”
    • “To keep the pressure on. A private institution is not held to the same statutory standard as a public institution but has a great deal more autonomy and flexibility. A private institution has the affluence, autonomy and the resources to take an aggressive stand on issues of morality and social awareness.”
    • “Keep the pressure on and don’t allow schools to get complacent.”

Conestoga High School

  • Number of respondents: 13 
  • Affiliation of respondents: Current Students and Alumni
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with Conestoga’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: Yes
  • 0% of respondents were satisfied with the action [SCHOOL] has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Conestoga ranked a 1.77 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Conestoga from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “The school needs to hold racists more accountable, this one girl got “expelled” for saying the n-word on IG Live and then was back the next year.”
    • “Be public with efforts so people like me are aware. Incorporate local, and both public/private, into the cause. Not talking schools, but any organization, group, anything and everything. My 20th year reunion this past November did not have ONE black alum attend.”
    • “Conestoga needs to take more serious actions against students who commit racist acts, expand the overwhelmingly white student leadership to ensure it includes people of colour, especially black students, bring back the African American studies course WITH a black teacher, teach minority history in all history classes, bring on more black faculty and faculty of colour in general, and actually do something useful with the SOAR program which, right now, isn’t serving any purpose other than making admin feel good about themselves”
    • “It can and should have teachers who are vigilant in watching out for racism and have teachers in hallway duty.”
    • “Listen to what current and alumni students are staring.  Own up to the racist culture created at Conestoga & stop hiding in the shadows.”
    • “I think that the first thing the school should do is acknowledge the posts made here. The least they could do is post an announcement on the school website, their response, and encourage students and alumni to share their experience.”
  • Key suggestions for the Conestoga community to bring change: same as above
    • “Systematic reform”
    • “Continue telling our stories.”

Radnor High School

  • Number of respondents: 7
  • Affiliation of respondents: Current Students, Alumni, and Educators
  • 29% of respondents were satisfied with Radnor’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: Yes
  • 29% of respondents were satisfied with the action Radnor has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Radnor ranked a 2.29 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Radnor from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Hire people to inspect students’ uses of social media in terms of any racist posts and hold the students accountable.”
    • “Address microaggressions, make the effort to teach accurate history (not white-washed), change the damn mascot, implement disciplinary action against students and teachers exhibiting racism”
    • “Include more black history in the curriculum and teach students how to be kind and be actively aware of the impact of their words and actions.”
    • “More inclusion among students and really understanding that racism in the school stems from the adults more than students”
  • Key suggestions for the Radnor community to bring change: same as above
    • “Hold more protests.”
    • “Keep fighting until everyone is treated equally. Don’t let up, the squeaky wheel gets the oil”
    • “Look for ways to bring different schools together”

Villa Maria Academy High School

  • Number of respondents: 11
  • Affiliation of respondents: 
  • 36% of respondents were satisfied with Villa Maria’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: Yes
  • 18% of respondents were satisfied with the action Villa Maria’s has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Villa Maria ranked a 2.18 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Villa Maria from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Have actual consequences for faculty and students when this behavior arises. Make it safe to report these actions.”
    • “Hire Black teachers and faculty. Get new textbooks that accurately describe the history of the US and teach us about more than Ross Parks and MLK. Diversify the authors we read in English classes. 0 tolerance policy for racist behavior at school AND on social media.”
    • “The literature curriculum needs an overhaul. They need to hire and retain faculty members that are BIPOC. They need to engage with not just the students, but their parents as well.” 
  • Key suggestions for the Villa Maria community to bring change: same as above
    • “Changes in leadership need to happen for some of these schools. Also, some schools are affiliated with each other. I think vmahs should break affiliation with Malvern after its treatment of the Villa students “
    • “Hold them accountable. Demand consequences for students and teachers. Too many of the girls I went to high school with spent their adolescence getting away with awful things, racism and cultural appropriation included.”

Sacred Heart Academy

  • Number of respondents: 5
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alumni
  • 20% of respondents were satisfied with Sacred Heart’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: Yes
  • 20% of respondents were satisfied with the action Sacred Heart has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Sacred Heart ranked a 2.0 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Sacred Heart from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Sacred Heart Academy needs to provide resources for BIPOC members of the school community. Reading books on racism while a great resource is not enough to dismantle the schools history of systemic racism. Programs such as Courageous Conversations and Social Justice class can only prove effective IF Sacred Heart chooses to take a strict stance against racism and microaggressions. There needs to be explicit guidelines on the repercussions for prejudiced actions in the student handbook AND those repercussions MUST be followed through on. On a number of occasions Sacred Heart Academy has implemented guidelines in the handbook for what is and is not allowed and yet these rules are not enforced. Students whose parents are members of administration are given leeway when they break rules over other members of the students body. The double standard for disciplinary actions needs to stop. Rules must be implemented on a fair and consistent level. There needs to be active and consistent dialogue between administration, students, parents and alums to create an anti-racist atmosphere.  A few white faculty allies are not enough to support BIPOC members of the school community. While the faculty can be very supportive it is not enough when there is no diversity in the faculty. The history of racism needs to be more heavily included in the history curriculum and difficult conversations need to be held both in and out of the classroom. Students should be able to anonymously report prejudiced actions they have experienced or observed so as to protect students who fear their voices will not be heard. Sacred Heart needs to become inclusive of its student body on every single level. It is not enough to hear the voices of just black members of the community. While undeniably important Sacred Heart needs to hear all BIPOC, LGBT+, and faith background’s voices. All members of the community should be treated with equity and respect regardless or race, religion or creed.Sacred Heart needs to openly acknowledge its own racist history and use it as a stepping stone for growth.”
    • “Hire BIPOC staff. Redo the curricula. Actually talk about race beyond ~courageous conversations~. Bring in anti-racist alumnae to talk to the white students when racist issues arise instead of bringing in Black alumnae to talk to Black students to be like “it’s gets better?” Reconsider staff training and discipline procedures. Reconsider dress codes. Reconsider classes and placements.”
    • “Hire people of color (preferably women) to empower the girls and make them feel safe. Additionally, I think allowing a diversity club would be helpful. Teaching about all sides of history and learning about more than just Frederick Douglass and slavery (a worthy topic) in history. I think empowering women of color through using them as historic examples of resilience and innovation can help. I’m not a POC myself so I’m sure this is just the tip of the iceberg.” 
  • Key suggestions for the Sacred Heart community to bring change: same as above
    • “The community needs to pressure not only SHA to become anti racist but all mainline schools. Sacred Heart needs to be continually held to a higher standard than its past and needs to be held accountable well into the future. All schools on the mainline need to actively condemn racist actions instead of attempting to appease it racist benefactors.”
    • “I think there should be a conference between schools where faculty and students can engage in an open discussion about ways to improve and establish a means for black students to feel safe and to be afforded the same educational experience as their white counterparts.”

Baldwin

  • Number of respondents: 17
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alum, students, parent, staff
  • 20%  of respondents were satisfied with Baldwins’s response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: yes
  • 22%  of respondents were satisfied with the action Baldwin has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Baldwin ranked a 1.9 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Baldwin from its community: 
    • “Baldwin needs to go beyond symbolic change and introduce concrete policies to protect Black students: a zero tolerance policy for the usage of racial slurs, specific rules and consequences for racist incidents, the celebration of Black students and their successes (not just the mourning of Black life lost)”
    • “Head of school should stop being defensive & listen to what’s really true & important”
    • “First things first, Baldwin has to admit fault and own up to its flaws. Realize that these quotes are real and true and acknowledge that. Even that hasn’t been done by the administration. After that, they should hold open forums for only BIPOC students to voice not only their concerns, but what they NEED from the school. From there they can hold forums that would include white students also have speakers, workshop days etc we held a million assemblies for stupid things I know they have time for this. Also rewrite our history curriculum—update it, talk about current events, maybe discuss the news every morning, bring back CIVICS and talk about the law and how it works for or against us. “

Haverford

  • Number of respondents: 8
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alum, students, parent, teacher
  • 37.5%  of respondents were satisfied with Haverford  response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: yes
  • 36.5%  of respondents were satisfied with the action Haverford has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), Haverford ranked a 2.5 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for Haverford from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Hire more Black teachers and administrators, continue to hold people accountable for missteps, “micro aggressions”, as well as outright racism, continue to hear and listen to the voices of all students,  parents and alumni, continue training all members of our community in anti-racist theory and action.” 
    • “Parents need to understand the reasons for change and support it.
    • “All schools should agree that social justice has to be taught in the schools- if all do it then families won’t leave one school to avoid curriculum changes.”
    • The local news media, township leaders, and police forces should all be part of the conversation”
    • “Make it clear just how damaging it was for the hundreds of students that spent half or more of our childhoods in places that traumatized us daily. Instead of being places that we felt safe, they were minefields of mistreatment in which students often felt isolated and neglected. “

EA

  • Number of respondents: 11
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alum, students, parent, sibling
  • 18.2%  of respondents were satisfied with EA response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: no
  • 18.2%  of respondents were satisfied with the action EA has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), EA ranked 2 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for EA from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Create a no tolerance policy, fund diversity board and department, reorganize curriculums with new textbooks and authors.”
    • “Institute action plans for educating teachers and students on racial justice.  Increase POC representation on the staff and in the classroom.  Provide counseling and safe/anonymous ways of sharing experiences about which the administration will be told and will support the poc.”
    • “Actions. The letters they have written will be meaningless if they don’t implement real change. And white parents still have the most money and power and will continue to guide EA. I hope the administration has the commitment to live their pledges. Antiracism is not a checkbox, a quick audit and forming of a committee. You must change the culture. And that takes time. Time will tell.”

Notre Dame

  • Number of respondents: 5
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alum, students, parent, staff
  • 0%  of respondents were satisfied with ND response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: yes
  • 0%  of respondents were satisfied with the action ND has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), NDranked a 2.5 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for ND from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases, good to have as many as possible? 
    • “Naming a director of diversity.”
    • “Listen to their black students and their struggles, put a zero tolerance policy in place,  educate their students, and enforce the new rules.”
    • “Hire staff that are not all white. Listen to the students of color that express their concerns regarding racism in the school. Comprehensively train teachers AND students in anti-racism. Update the curriculum to truly teach students what they need to know for life.’

Friends Central

  • Number of respondents: 16
  • Affiliation of respondents: Alum, students, educator
  • 9%  of respondents were satisfied with FC response to these stories and our platform 
  • Do our posts show on their account: yes
  • 6.2%  of respondents were satisfied with the action FC has taken in response to the stories on BMLS
  • On a scale of 1-5 (1 being have not done enough; 5 being they’ve done plenty), FC ranked a 1.9 on ensuring the school is a safe learning environment for Black students
  • Key suggestions for FC from its community: this can be full quotes or phrases
    • “Take accountability for the awful things that go on at our school and have a zero tolerance policy for racism”
    • “For starters, FCS would do much better with a new head of school. Our current head of school has been mentioned multiple times as the perpetrator of racism on campus, and is unfortunately now directly in charge of half of the new plan to address racism at FCS. We can’t have someone unfit to carry out these necessary changes at school maintaining such a high leadership position. We would benefit greatly from having someone more qualified serve as Head of School. FCSForRacialJustice called for his resignation as well and FCS has yet to address that. Furthermore, we only have a select few BIPOC faculty on campus, and three of these teachers stepped down this past spring. Now we only have 2 Black faculty members that I can think of off the top of my head. FCS needs to hire more diverse teachers, as many Black FCS students have said they were negatively impacted academically and/or emotionally by the lack of Black staff/faculty.”
    • “They need to take action instead of just talking about how diverse and inclusive our community is”